The 50 Worst Things On The Internet In 2015

The internet is usually a good place. But let’s be real. Not at all times. So here are the worst/grossest/best-worst things from 2015.

If you’ll be able to stomach it, take a look at our 50 Worst Things lists from 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Enjoy this, and as at all times, we’re sorry.

1. The atheist grandson who doesn’t want to say grace at Thanksgiving.

Twitter: @chaeronaea

2. This egg-laying “ovipositor” dildo that lays an egg inside the orfice of your choice.

primalhardwere.com

3. The girl who buttchugged cough syrup.

Twitter: @freakmommy

4. This lady’s very intimate 4th of July fireworks display.

Via out-gayed-myself.tumblr.com

5. This deep-throating anthem.

youtube.com

6. The guy from the “Stuff in My Dick” Tumblr who did this to a Minion.

stuffinmydick.tumblr.com

7. This video of shirtless British guys in an alleyway.

8. These weirdly adorably photos from Things My Dick Does Tumblr.

thingsmydickdoes.tumblr.com

thingsmydickdoes.tumblr.com

9. This dude who turned his own face into a bong.

10. These Minion dildos.

bestnatesmithever.tumblr.com

11. This Minion in a place it doesn’t belong.

lohantichrist.tumblr.com

12. This couple’s Minions-themed wedding.

Amazing ‘Minions’ themed wedding in Cumbria! #OneInAMinion http://t.co/OtuPR1z7EH

— BBC Cumbria (@BBC_Cumbria)

13. This crowdfunding campaign.

Twitter: @notgroomp

14. This furry in a Confederate flag fur suit.

What THE FUCK

— northwest moistfest (@teru_tt)

15. Sonic the Hedgehog remembering 9/11.

deviantart.com

16. This Meninist promprosal.

sheatriceisreal.tumblr.com

17. The guy who fucked this chicken for Thanksgiving.

Twitter: @Teridax

18. The mom who was willing to just wash off the Thanksgiving turkey after the dog humped it.

@crazyjewishmom / Via instagram.com

19. The time that someone put porn on the speakers in a Target.

youtube.com

20. Vaping through a fur suit.

vine.co

21. This inebriated UConn student who got kicked out of the food hall for screaming when he wasn’t served mac ‘n cheese.

youtube.com

22. This Confederate brony.

3lixar.tumblr.com

23. This white kid’s cover of “Trap Queen” by Fetty Wap.

youtube.com

24. The person who forgot to turn the flash off on this creepshot of actress Chloë Moretz.

imgur.com

25. The way this couple makes waffles.

imgur.com

26. The song “Drill Time” by Slim Jesus.

youtube.com

27. The Kawaii Donald Trump Tumblr.

28. This peanut butter baby.

vine.co

Which inspired this peanut butter man.

vine.co

And these peanut butter women.

vine.co

29. This “Today I Fucked Up” story on Reddit about a guy who lost his erection at the same time as losing his virginity because his girlfriend made Shrek jokes.

reddit.com

So this happened a little under two months ago, but I felt as if this had to be shared because it was extremely traumatizing.

So my girlfriend and I were getting it on for the first time, and it involved really good foreplay and cuddling and whatnot. With me, in terms of a new person for the first time, my nerves can get the best of me and sometimes I suffer from performance anxiety in terms of first times with others, so right through sex I had a hard time keeping it up (my penis that is) simply as a result of the nerves I was experiencing. My girlfriend understood completely and we decided to take a break and check out again in maybe 30 minutes.

So when we finally got into it again, it was much better. We were really going at it missionary style when she says to me, “when you cum just pull out and do it on my stomach.” That was fine with me, so I kept going until 15 seconds later she said, “Yeah. Better out than in I at all times say.” At that moment I exploded. I laughed so fucking hard and my erection disappeared faster than most things possibly can. I was on her bed with my limp dick in her and I was losing it. Needless to say, sexy time went unfinished that night, and that was that. Thankfully, she found it really funny too, and takes one of the vital blame for it. Shrek is love, shrek is life.

TL;DR – Having sex with girlfriend for first time, she makes shrek joke, I laugh so hard I lose my erection, sex over.

Via reddit.com

30. The guys who didn’t realize this was a horse vagina photoshopped onto a woman.

31. What Old Spice does to this kid.

vine.co

32. The vajankle.

sinthetics.biz

And this used one.

the-cringe-channel.tumblr.com

33. This girl who loves memes.

vine.co

34. This horrific Pokémon porn parody called “Strokemon.”

youtube.com

35. The proliferation of sexually charged, aggressive chain texts.

36. Basically any Zoobe video.

37. The Deviant Art user “BigKneeLover” who draws anime girls with big knees.

bigkneelover.deviantart.com

 

38. This Little Mermaid and her dead squids.

Facebook: video.php

39. The toy that came in this cereal box.

i.imgur.com

40. The guy who is obsessed with the idea of someone eating his foot, making a foot quesadilla.

jatek-a-lab.deviantart.com

41. This guy’s Facebook comment.

imgur.com

42. This sexy melting anime figurine.

harbingerofcookies.tumblr.com

 

43. This pony playing.

vine.co

44. The students who misunderstood what the “puppy petting session” was going to be…

facebook.com

45. The woman who made sourdough bread using vaginal yeast.

https://stavvers.wordpress.com/2015/11/25/baking-and-eating-cuntsourdough/

 

46. A furry talking about how he was going to smoke a joint with his fursona.

reddit.com

47. This medical issue.

Twitter: @2Unclever4U

48. What this dog is doing to this phone.

My mom sent me this at the same time as I was outside in the snow, that’s my phone..

— Genesis (@genesisjtepper)

49. This tweet.

Twitter: @ufobri

50. And this guy’s Minion Fleshlight setup.

post your rig

— A Parsons Zackly (@sexyfacts4u)

If for some shocking reason you liked what you saw here, definitely take a look at BuzzFeed’s Internet Explorer podcast.

w.soundcloud.com

And part one of “The Worst Things” with an interview with the buttchugging girls and the turkey-fucking guy.

w.soundcloud.com

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U.S. May Begin Reviewing Social Media Accounts Of Visa Applicants

The U.S. is considering how one can tighten its visa screening process after San Bernardino shooter Tashfeen Malik was once granted a so-called “fiancé visa” despite a reported history of making radical statements online.

Malik arrived in the U.S. in May 2014 under a K-1 visa, sometimes called a fiancé visa. She passed three background checks in spite of openly talking about violent jihad on social media, the New York Times reported. She and her husband, Syed Rizwan Farook, an American citizen, would go on to kill 14 people at a holiday party for county workers in San Bernardino, California.

In 2014, immigration officials did not screen the social media accounts of people entering the U.S., fearing public backlash, ABC News reported. A former Homeland Security official told the network that under a secret policy, immigration authorities were not allowed to do social media screenings.

But it’s unclear if even without the policy, officials would have been able to find Malik’s posts. Unnamed officials told CNN she used strict privacy settings in addition to a false name.

A White House spokesman said Monday that President Obama will look closely at recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security and State Department to tighten security gaps. The Department of Homeland Security has three pilot programs that incorporate a review of social media posts, and officials will look at other how one can include social media searches in its daily duties, the Associated Press reported.

“The president’s top priority here is the national security and safety of the American people,” spokesman Josh Earnest said. “And so as to continue to be the case with ensuring that this K-1 visa program is effectively implemented, consistent with the law and consistent with the values we hold dear in this country.”

Earnest did not provide a specific period of time for when new policies might go into effect.

“The president is feeling a sense of urgency about this,” he said.

Currently, social media companies will release information to aid law enforcement agencies — if ordered to take action by a court or with a valid search warrant. Federal authorities have not said how social media screening of private accounts could turn out to be a part of a visa process.

At Facebook, law enforcement officers may request information through an online form. Content from a person’s account may be revealed if law enforcement can show probable cause through a search warrant. Emergency requests will be considered if there is “imminent harm to a child or risk of death or serious physical injury to any person,” Facebook said.

Twitter in a similar way requires court orders or search warrants, though it is additionally a company policy to notify users that law enforcement has requested account information. The company also allows for emergency requests on a case-by-case basis.

Its guidelines state: “If we receive information that provides us with a good faith belief that there is an exigent emergency involving the danger of death or serious physical injury to a person, we may provide information necessary to prevent that harm, if we have it.”

Continue Reading

U.S. May Begin Reviewing Social Media Accounts Of Visa Applicants

The U.S. is considering how one can tighten its visa screening process after San Bernardino shooter Tashfeen Malik used to be granted a so-called “fiancé visa” despite a reported history of making radical statements online.

Malik arrived in the U.S. in May 2014 under a K-1 visa, often referred to as a fiancé visa. She passed three background checks in spite of openly talking about violent jihad on social media, the New York Times reported. She and her husband, Syed Rizwan Farook, an American citizen, would go on to kill 14 people at a holiday party for county workers in San Bernardino, California.

In 2014, immigration officials did not screen the social media accounts of people entering the U.S., fearing public backlash, ABC News reported. A former Homeland Security official told the network that under a secret policy, immigration authorities were not allowed to do social media screenings.

But it’s unclear if even without the policy, officials would have been able to find Malik’s posts. Unnamed officials told CNN she used strict privacy settings in addition to a false name.

A White House spokesman said Monday that President Obama will look closely at recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security and State Department to tighten security gaps. The Department of Homeland Security has three pilot programs that incorporate a review of social media posts, and officials will look at other how one can include social media searches in its daily duties, the Associated Press reported.

“The president’s top priority here is the national security and safety of the American people,” spokesman Josh Earnest said. “And a good way to continue to be the case with ensuring that this K-1 visa program is effectively implemented, consistent with the law and consistent with the values we hold dear in this country.”

Earnest did not provide a specific period of time for when new policies might go into effect.

“The president is feeling a sense of urgency about this,” he said.

Currently, social media companies will release information to aid law enforcement agencies — if ordered to take action by a court or with a valid search warrant. Federal authorities have not said how social media screening of private accounts could turn out to be a part of a visa process.

At Facebook, law enforcement officers may request information through an online form. Content from a person’s account may be revealed if law enforcement can show probable cause through a search warrant. Emergency requests will be considered if there is “imminent harm to a child or risk of death or serious physical injury to any person,” Facebook said.

Twitter in a similar way requires court orders or search warrants, though it is additionally a company policy to notify users that law enforcement has requested account information. The company also allows for emergency requests on a case-by-case basis.

Its guidelines state: “If we receive information that provides us with a good faith belief that there is an exigent emergency involving the danger of death or serious physical injury to a person, we may provide information necessary to prevent that harm, if we have it.”

Continue Reading

Facebook’s Real Name Policy Enforcement Changes Are Here, But Questions Remain

In late October, Facebook promised a number of enforcement changes to its controversial ‘Real Names’ policy, which had come under fire for its tendency to unfairly remove people from the platform. Today the company is rolling them out.

The policy, which requires people use their “authentic name” on Facebook, was being enforced with such rigidity that people with special circumstances – including members of the trans community and advocates for certain political causes – were continuously subject to process hell and long-term account suspension when reported as violators of the policy.

Facebook is rolling out its new enforcement procedures, which add a more human aspect to the “name confirmation” process, with the intent of easing the road back to the platform for those unfairly reported under the policy. Facebook is not, then again, changing a word in the letter of the law.

“We want to make it easier for people to confirm their name if necessary.”

“We want to reduce the number of people who are asked to verify their name on Facebook when they are already using the name people know them by,” the company said in a blog post. “We want to make it easier for people to confirm their name if necessary.”

The enforcement changes are significant. Facebook is adding a “I have a special circumstance,” option for users reported as violators of the policy. When people are asked to “prove” their name and select that option, Facebook will put the case in the hands of its most experienced fortify representatives who will receive special training.

Facebook is also forcing people who report a “Real Name” violation to provide context in conjunction with their report, a change which should help cut down on instances of the policy being used to inflict harm on others. The company is also promising to not remove a person’s account as long as they are engaged with a fortify representative.

The enforcement changes were promised after Facebook received a sternly worded letter demanding action from several groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Human Rights Watch. The letter called the policy “broken,” and said Facebook “maintains a system that disregards the circumstances of users in countries with low levels of internet penetration, exposes its users to danger, disrespects the identities of its users, and curtails free speech.”

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Stephen Lam / Reuters

Though the enforcement changes will likely be welcome, it’s still unclear whether they are going to be enough to substantially change the negative experiences of those affected by the policy.

The changes also seem to have overlooked some key issues, such as the fact that a person does not have to be Facebook friends with someone (the bedrock of connection on the platform) to report them as a real name violator. The company is also largely reliant on user reports, and it’s difficult to consider people would cite people to Facebook unless they are upset with them by some means.

Finally, Facebook requires significant documentation for someone to prove their name, which can be unattainable to produce for people with shifting identities, such as those in the trans community, and political activists who use a pseudonym for safety.

In an email, Facebook sent along a number of quotes from groups approving the moves, including one by GLAAD CEO & President Sarah Kate Ellis, who said:

“By taking important steps to reinforce its name policy, Facebook is once again demonstrating a strong commitment to inclusion and respect for LGBT users.

GLAAD looks forward to our continued work with Facebook to further reinforce on this policy and ensure that the world’s largest social network remains a place where all people can feel accepted and protected to be their authentic selves.”

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Facebook’s Real Name Policy Enforcement Changes Are Here, But Questions Remain

In late October, Facebook promised a number of enforcement changes to its controversial ‘Real Names’ policy, which had come under fire for its tendency to unfairly remove people from the platform. Today the company is rolling them out.

The policy, which requires people use their “authentic name” on Facebook, was being enforced with such rigidity that people with special circumstances – including members of the trans community and advocates for certain political causes – were frequently subject to process hell and long-term account suspension when reported as violators of the policy.

Facebook is rolling out its new enforcement procedures, which add a more human aspect to the “name confirmation” process, with the intent of easing the road back to the platform for those unfairly reported under the policy. Facebook is not, on the other hand, changing a word in the letter of the law.

“We want to make it easier for people to confirm their name if necessary.”

“We want to reduce the number of people who are asked to verify their name on Facebook when they are already using the name people know them by,” the company said in a blog post. “We want to make it easier for people to confirm their name if necessary.”

The enforcement changes are significant. Facebook is adding a “I have a special circumstance,” option for users reported as violators of the policy. When people are asked to “prove” their name and select that option, Facebook will put the case in the hands of its most experienced give a boost to representatives who will receive special training.

Facebook is also forcing people who report a “Real Name” violation to provide context along side their report, a change which should help cut down on instances of the policy being used to inflict harm on others. The company is also promising to not remove a person’s account as long as they are engaged with a give a boost to representative.

The enforcement changes were promised after Facebook received a sternly worded letter demanding action from several groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Human Rights Watch. The letter called the policy “broken,” and said Facebook “maintains a system that disregards the circumstances of users in countries with low levels of internet penetration, exposes its users to danger, disrespects the identities of its users, and curtails free speech.”

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Stephen Lam / Reuters

Though the enforcement changes will likely be welcome, it’s still unclear whether they are going to be enough to substantially change the negative experiences of those affected by the policy.

The changes also seem to have overlooked some key issues, such as the fact that a person does not have to be Facebook friends with someone (the bedrock of connection on the platform) to report them as a real name violator. The company is also largely reliant on user reports, and it’s difficult to believe people would cite people to Facebook unless they are upset with them by hook or by crook.

Finally, Facebook requires significant documentation for someone to prove their name, which can be inconceivable to produce for people with shifting identities, such as those in the trans community, and political activists who use a pseudonym for safety.

In an email, Facebook sent along a number of quotes from groups approving the moves, including one by GLAAD CEO & President Sarah Kate Ellis, who said:

“By taking important steps to fortify its name policy, Facebook is once again demonstrating a strong commitment to inclusion and respect for LGBT users.

GLAAD looks forward to our continued work with Facebook to further fortify on this policy and ensure that the world’s largest social network remains a place where all people can feel accepted and secure to be their authentic selves.”

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A HIV-Positive Dating App Leaked 5,000 Users’ Data

A security researcher has discovered that user data was until recently leaking from two health apps: Hzone, a dating app for HIV-positive singles, and iFit, a fitness app.

The leaks, which have been both repaired as of Monday, are believed to have left the personal information of Hzone and iFit users vulnerable since at least late November and last week, respectively, according to the cybersecurity blog DataBreaches.net, which first reported them.

These two leaks together have an effect on far fewer people than another data breach affecting 13 million users of the software MacKeeper, a breach reported the same day and discovered by the same “white hat” security researcher Chris Vickery. But the health app leaks are significant because they contained, in some cases, unusually sensitive and personal information. They also underscore how many health apps do not have to comply with federal patient privacy laws — despite the fact that they collect personal information — if they do not share that information with doctors and others bound by those same privacy laws.

In the case of Hzone, such information included names, email addresses, birthdays, relationship statuses, number of children, sexual orientation, sexual experiences, and messages like this, according to DataBreaches.net: “Hi. I was diagnosed 3 years ago now. CD4 and Viral Load is quite good. I’m therefore not on Meds yet. My 6-monthly blood tests are due in June. Planning to go in meds. I’m worried about the side effects. What kinds of side effect have you experienced? Xx.” As many as 5,000 users appeared in the breach.

Meanwhile, more than 567,000 users were exposed in a data breach involving iFit, an app that syncs with wearable devices and exercise equipment like NordicTrack and Reebok. iFit can collect information like passwords, weight, gender, addresses, credit card data, and workout data (like your heart rate and date and time of your workout).

Vickery told BuzzFeed News that he discovered the leaks by looking through Shodan, a search engine that indexes pretty much anything connected to the internet. After he found databases for iFit and Hzone and realized they shouldn’t be public, he brought them to the attention of DataBreaches.net.

Both Vickery and DataBreaches.net, whose publisher goes by “Dissent,” alerted Hzone’s developers to the leak. DataBreaches.net reported that Hzone did not safe the leak for five days after it was contacted Dec. 8, nor did it immediately respond to their inquires. “The Hzone leak was particularly frustrating to both of us because even though it was the smallest leak I reported, the data were so sensitive,” Dissent told BuzzFeed News in an email. “We simply could not get a response from them despite the usage of their contact form on their web site (both of us tried) and despite email to their make stronger email address, which generated a receipt that it was opened.”

Vickery told iFit about its leak by email on Dec. 10. The company claimed what he’d discovered was a years-old test database “with real data” and said it would be taken down; on Monday, Vickery was told the issue had been resolved.

On Wednesday, two days after DataBreaches.net reported the breaches, Hzone CEO Justin Robert told BuzzFeed News by e-mail that the leak had happened whilst the company was updating its servers. He wrote, “However, the breach was identified very impulsively, and strong security measures were put in place to safe the servers and databases immediately.” He had not notified users yet; he said he planned to do so by posting an announcement on the website.

iFit did not respond to requests for comment on the breaches or its respective plan for notifying affected users.

UPDATE

This post was updated to include comments from Hzone’s CEO.

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The Wild World Of The College Photo Sharing App Yeti

 

“Post-smash” (post-coitus) and “FTY” (for the Yeti) are two popular memes on the app.

Let’s say you were in search of an app you could use to share some wild shit troublesome pix with your college bros. You’d probably want something completely anonymous, like Yik Yak. You might also want an app that connected you with other like-minded bros at your university. Well, my horny friend dreaming of a place to anonymously share your semi-nudes and cool bags of weed, your search is over, and it ends with Yeti.

Yeti displays streams of still images and video, incessantly with a text overlay, from various universities. It’s like a Snapchat city Story for colleges, but far more raw. Whereas Snapchat stories offer a cheery, family-friendly version of the day in the life of a city, Yeti provides an NC-17 peek into a frat house basement at 3 a.m. on a Saturday. And it’s going buck-wild nationwide.

 

Two moments of collegiate triumph.

Yeti was first rolled out at hard-partying Southern universities before working its way north — there’s still no Harvard or Yale on it. Today, there are Yeti channels for some 2,000 American colleges and universities. Of those, several hundred are “very active,” according to Yeti spokesperson Ben Kaplan. The app grew out of the ashes of Cinemagram (it’s currently burning through the $800 million Series A investment Cinemagram got a few years ago) and Kaplan’s old app Wigo, which helped college kids plan parties.

Yeti builds communities around individual schools, but it doesn’t require a .edu email or proof of attendance to sign up. And once you’re in, you’ll be able to surf any school you’d like or watch overall trending “Yetis” in much the same way you’ll be able to peek at other locations with Yik Yak.

 

“See a dog post a dog” is another meme, as well as the typical plights of college life.

One key element that sets Yeti apart from Snapchat and Yik Yak is a feature that’s one of its best assets — and potentially one of its worst flaws. Each school’s feed is moderated by power users called “campus Yetis.” These volunteer moderators sift through incoming images, filtering out spam and harassment (nudity and light criminal activity don’t seem to be verboten). Campus Yetis are selected automatically via an algorithm that scans for highly engaged users, and Kaplan says these mods are part of Yeti’s “secret sauce.” He wouldn’t disclose the average number of mods per school, but did say there are “tens of thousands” of such campus Yetis all over the country.

Yeti has just four full-time staffers on its content team. But outsourcing moderation to students has benefits beyond just lowering the company’s overhead — it also lets campuses have their own in-jokes and personality.

“Snapchat has several campus Stories, but it’s in fact helped us. When Snapchat chooses the content, it’s very bland and PG,” Kaplan told BuzzFeed News. “Whereas for the people who in fact go to these schools and have the power to control [their own content], it’s much more personal and fun.”

“Let’s say there’s a landmark on campus you’re not supposed to go on, like a fountain,” Kaplan explained. “So some kid starts swimming in the fountain, and another kids posts a video of it. Everyone in the school understands how funny that is.”

On the flip side, having a small group of college students moderate their own college’s feed is a little like letting the lunatics run the asylum. Using unpaid moderators selected only because they are hardcore Yeti users could leave the app vulnerable to personal bias on a hot-button issue on campus — or poor moderation.

Currently, Yeti offers no report/block function for users to alert the moderators of objectionable content or harassment.

 

Admins, known as “campus Yetis,” are automatically selected by algorithm.

Anonymous social sharing apps and websites targeted at colleges have not had the best track record on the subject of cyberbullying and harassment. The founder of Juicy Campus has publicly bemoaned the gossip site’s evolution into a “cyberbullying platform”; Yik Yak has also grappled with harassment and racism, detailed in an episode of the podcast Reply All.

Kaplan says that Yeti does alert authorities on the subject of harassment and threats. But the company doesn’t pay much attention to photos and videos of typical college hijinks and debauchery. After all, a photo of someone’s weed stash isn’t exactly good reason to call in the FBI, nor would it in point of fact be legally actionable.

That said, there’s some pretty disturbing stuff to be found on Yeti. Recently, a video of some kids giving what looked to be cocaine to a house cat went viral on the app, making it to Yeti’s trending section. The video inspired lots of outraged discussion on Yeti — and Twitter and Reddit as well. But it had to pass through Yeti’s moderation queue before anyone saw it, and it had to remain unmoderated for people to comment on it.

Yeti is hardly unique as a showcase of college kids behaving like dumbasses. But there’s something about it that hints at a powder keg of bad ideas about to go off. Yet also, it’s incredibly fun. Again, it’s a lot like college itself.

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The European Union Is Pushing New Data Protection Laws

In a bid to give protection to consumers in an age of unprecedented data collection, European officials moved Tuesday to update a 20-year old privacy law, granting EU citizens greater regulate over how tech companies collect their personal information.

The new data protection rules will cover Europeans during the continent’s 28 member states, replacing a patchwork of national laws. The agreement compels companies like Google and Netflix to share with consumers how their data is collected and processed. The regulations also codify the “right to be forgotten,” which allows consumers to petition firms to delete outdated or irrelevant data stored about them.

“Citizens and businesses will benefit from clear rules that are fit for the digital age,” said Vera Jourová, the Justice Commissioner for the European Union’s executive arm.

In the event of a serious data breach, the law would force companies to rapidly notify national authorities. It also requires that consumers aged 13–16 receive a parent’s permission before registering for social sharing services like Instagram and Snapchat.

For companies that violate the rules, which do extend to Silicon Valley heavyweights doing business in Europe, penalties are high: fines of up to 4% of a firm’s global revenue.

According to European policymakers, the new data protection rules signal not only a commitment to consumer protection, but an effort at keeping European tech companies globally competitive. They are intended to help fortify the EU economy for digital goods and services, they say. Known as the digital single market, the initiative was announced earlier this year.

“We should not see privacy and data protection as holding back economic activities,” said Andrus Ansip, the commission’s vice president for the digital single market. “They are, actually, an essential competitive advantage.”

The American tech industry, then again, may not share this vision. Europe’s privacy protections, in conjunction with the single market, are part of what some U.S. business leaders consider is a harsh regulatory environment — protectionism disguised as consumer welfare. Facebook currently faces several privacy probes launched by authorities in Germany, France, and Belgium. And the European Commission leveled antitrust charges against Google in April.

The European parliament and national governments are expected to adopt the final text of the law at the beginning of 2016. The rules will then take effect within two years.

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Startup Employees Do A Terrifying “Hotline Bling” Parody

Startups that accept cash from First Round Capital get the standard venture capital benefits like advice and prestige. But what in reality matters is this: in addition they get the chance to star within the firm’s year-end holiday video.

The up to date First Round video, released this morning, is a tech-themed mashup of parodies of pop songs from 2015. It features a lot of First Round portfolio company employees, in addition to the firm’s partners, like Josh Kopelman. The video wreaks havoc on hits including Mark Ronson’s “Uptown Funk,” Justin Bieber’s “Sorry,” and Drake’s “Hotline Bling.”

Some of the lyrics are topical! For example, this one, to the tune of “Sorry,” referring to moves by the mutual fund Fidelity to write down the value of its startup holdings:

“Yeah I know Fidelity marked you down, and everyone knows your stock price now.”

Watch the full video below:

It starts with an “Uptown Funk” parody.

…..

Then they go around surprisng innocent workers on their lunchbreak.

Then “I Can’t Feel My Face” by The Weeknd

And Justin Bieber’s “Sorry”.

Help.

HELP

*screams*

*HYPERVENTILATING*

For the diehard fans available in the market, here’s find past First Round Capital videos.

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With Redesigned App, Lyft Grows Up

At first blush, it kind of feels silly to view the redesign of an app as a sign that a company is maturing. But in the 1099 economy, where interaction between a company and its customers occurs largely through an app, design is crucial — particularly for a company like Lyft, which aspires, literally, to end car ownership.

On Thursday morning, Lyft rolled out the latest iteration of an app that has seen little material change over the ride-hail company’s three-year lifespan. Once cluttered and unintuitive, the app is now cleaner and significantly less pink. In this way, it mirrors the design of Lyft’s elegant new “glowstaches,” which earlier this year replaced the unwieldy fuzzy pink mustaches the company once required drivers affix to their cars. The app can be navigated easily with thumb alone, and it clearly details your ride-hailing choices, right down to what number of people a car can fit and how long it’s going to take to arrive. It tells you exactly what you’re getting into before you leave the first screen, making it a slightly seamless experience that requires as little thought as, say, hailing a cab.

But for Lyft to effectively replace car ownership, as co-founders John Zimmer and Logan Green claim it aspires to do, the company should offer a means of commuting that’s in the same league of convenience and affordability as public transportation. Now, with a redesigned app, and paired with the commuter service Lyft launched last week as well as its Lyft Line carpool offering, the company is definitely getting a bit closer.

Lyft has also made it conceivable for residents of 14 countries to use its service when they shuttle to the U.S., enabling toughen for international phone numbers and credit cards. It’s an interesting attempt to target tourists searching for a ride to the airport or a local landmark. It also lays the groundwork for its cross-booking partnership with Didi Kuaidi, Ola, and GrabTaxi, which will go live in 2016. The 14 countries include the U.S., Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, Spain, France, the U.K., Singapore, India, Japan, Korea, and Mexico.

Like Lyft’s decision to forego the fuzzy pink mustaches and instead issue drivers magnetic, glow-in-the-dark mustaches easily placed on a car’s dashboard, the redesign of the company’s app suggests some newfound maturity. The new Lyft marker is easy to remove and, crucially, inconspicuous. It accounts for a casual Lyft driver who might need to switch over to another role as student or mom at a moment’s notice. It makes things easier. The same goes for the newly redesigned Lyft app design: The easier it is to use, the more of a utility it becomes. And if people use it enough, perhaps they won’t bother to invest in cars of their own.

But even with a slick new app, and an international partnership, Lyft has its work cut out for it. Rival Uber is well entrenched across the U.S. and is already viewed as a utility in some markets. Lyft may need a little more than an app redesign to take it to that level.

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